About your Search

20121006
20121014
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15
's organized this nonthreatening environment of pluralism, pluralism and that is manipulable, patronized in any sense controlled. but it's actually ultimately useless. and the result, the fundamental reason why algeria is a producing interesting political change, there's all the reason should know about, the fact that any sense it had its arab spring 20 years ago, algerians have a point when the same we been through this movie. we were way ahead of everybody. that's all perfectly true, but the fundamental reason of what is yes, people do not know what to do. of the regime and the opposition have reached the limits of their repertoire. and the western discourse on political change in this region are not suggesting anything useful to them at all. let me leave it there. >> fantastic, thank you very much. hugh as i was been one f the most astute analysts, a very difficult place i know, and he's just a marvelous job of describing the emergence of algeria's own version of liberalized hypocrisy. and, of course, i think he described what i consider liberalized autocracy ultimately to be, and that is tr
? quayle: i had a very strong record on the environment and the united states senate. [laughter] i have a record where i voted for the legislation. i have a record where i voted against my president of the override of the clean water act. i voted for the major pieces of environmental legislation that has come down and voted on in the united states senate. this administration i support this administration and its environmental effort is moved in the area of the first time to deal with the ozone problem. we now have an international plan to become a treaty that is commonly referred to as the montreal treaty. for the first time we are talking about the impact of the progress of the environment. we are committed to the impairment to take the children hiking and fishing, walking in the woods we have the commitment to reserving in the environment, to bring up the environment we can't help but think about the environmental policy of the governor of massachusetts. he talked about being an environmentalist. let me tell you about his environmental policy. the boston harbor, the boston harbor whic
're the best environment for the talent spent before we go to questions, jay, then i want to talk about campaign financing. >> so you're looking at california right now, and that massive increase in the cost of gasoline, when matt said, when consumers are paying for gasoline they are not able to purchase their basic commodities every day. so what's happening? governor brown is proposing a relaxation of regulations that impact the energy industry. that is clearly a concession that regulation drives the cost of energy. we've got to have that same focus and discussion here in washington. because what's happening in california can happen all across this country. >> hawaii, i heard -- >> when we do the big deal everybody thinks we have to do entitlements and defends on one side and taxes on the other. if you have a school pashtuns do with two legs he usually falls over. if we look at what the canadians did with their cash cow, we have more cash cow in energy than any of them. and we can do spending. we can do taxes, and we can to energy which is our cash cow if we go to and you can make a re
about monetary policy and current environment and focus primarily the role of large-scale asset purchases. before doing so let me note the usual disclaim, the thoughts are about to give you are my own and do not necessarily reflect the views of others on the fomc. there is a considerable diversity of views within the fomc and within, among economists more generally about the use of large-scale asset purchases, lsaps and other unconventional policy tools. this healthy given unenviable circumstances we find ourselves. let me be clear where i stand. i support the committees decision of last month, namely to initiate purchases of mortgage-backed securities, mbs, at a rate of $40 billion a month in tandem with the ongoing maturity extension program of treasury securities. and to plant a con to continue those purchases if the committee does not observe a substantial improvement in the labor market outlook. given where we are and given what we know i firmly believe this was the right decision. in my comments today, i'm only going to briefly review the kise for taking that action as tha
. so i'm not going to revise history to pretend that. i grew up in a religious environment and i am proud of it. i was into the priest. i'm proud of that. i would probably enormously angry right now. so i am grateful for my faith and on and on apologetic about it. >> this is pretty remarkable we started talking a little bit about how it has changed over time. we could have also added to the 19th amendment and women becoming a part of this part of the democratic inclusion. [laughter] but most of the amendments have made it more perfect. they got rid of it. >> ausley understand. >> it is pretty extraordinary. the constitution frees up every american to be eligible for public office, and there is no religious test and that wasn't the prominent feature of the state constitutions. a lot of them actually had religious tests. >> you have the establishment in religion. so, on a understand that but i simply say that the country moved on. i grew up at a time people were respectful of religion and religious people. on grew up when the church was open all the time and nobody broke and and nobod
? so you come into this environment. many people came in without a job. they're just volunteers and they want to get a job. some people, so they want to get noticed by the right people. and they, you know, and you have people who have been hired who want maybe more responsibility, right, and they probably traditional in their job. you have department heads who are racing against each other to maybe get a little more budget than the other and get a little more turf than the others than you might expect. you have this thing going on where it is a very chaotic time and you really need to get control of this because in this environment where there are no sort of norms, it is like building a village from scratch where everybody comes to a place with no rules, no norms, no structures, right? it's like the wild west and not everybody, you know, some people who, you know, have their own tactics for getting their own way, right? sometimes even good people lose control of their inner jerks. that is a problem early in the campaign, right? we all have them, come on. so you throw an elbow at
environment. >> the capstone concept forward says the world is trending towards greater stability, yet it says the world is potentially more dangerous than ever. how will the stability overcome the threat? >> well, you know, when people ask me about afghanistan, the first thing i normally tell them is it's possible for violence and progress to coexist in places like afghanistan. i'd say the same thing about the paradox of stability and threat. they coexist. so i've talked about a security paradox which is violence is at an evolutionary low. and it is, except that the capabilities to impart violence are in the hands of people who heretofore wouldn't have had access to them. so you have a paradox of feeling as though the world is -- this is kind of the tom friedman the world is flat and connected and, therefore, is less likely to fight each other. maybe. but there's also the other school of thought that says it's in the unconnected parts of our globe where violence will be both more prevalent, but also more violent because the instruments of violence are more available now than they've ever been
's. wherever i go i have business people. the regulatory environment. they all say it's terrible. it's not just banks. we have done it to ourselves. shoot ourselves in the foot. get rid of that white blanket. and they're is a great -- printed in the wall street journal. kate president-elect ronald reagan some advice. consistent taxes, regulatory. the same positive story over and over and over, and it will turn. and you have to believe in it. so america is usually going to do the right thing after it has exhausted the possibilities. i'm hoping we do. the important part to me is in washington, if you think that washington and business can go to work with each other and begin, collaboration is what should happen. we should have had collaboration we were in a crisis. every business i know wanted to help. would have pulled together, worked around the clock, but it became a war. we are really getting. so it is another wet blanket. the benefit to make it is right and move on. >> list transition. to the extent there has been a marked absence, collaboration, or significant friction between the worlds of
for the next 10 years. >> if you think about economic environment in this country. >> we don't want to let that happen here. >> to make a case you're trying to make him he picked a terrible time to do it. unemployment is 8.3%. how can you make this argument about immigration? >> how can you win in this environment? that's what i mask them. >> it's like how can you make an investment when times are tough? new york city walked away from his future back in the 70s. they did make an investment in infrastructure maintenance or anything because the economy was bad. i missed it decades to work their way out of it. if you go look at history in america when great things were done, the central park on the empire state building, things that start at the bottom of the recession. there is a guy, barnett, not barnett. he asked out by p. larry barnett -- gary barnett. everyone thinks he's crazy. he's been building for the low prices another cinemas demand. he just sold the top two floors and $90 million apiece and he stopped selling them because he can't keep up with the demand. it's got to wait until pr
's an understatement. but you go up and in environment, at least i was fortunately enough to where we believe that it was perfectible. you know, it's very, i think, pretty much acceptable or maybe somewhat today to be critical or almost invariably critical of the country and pointing out what is wrong. there are obviously things wrong. there were obviously things wrong when i grew up in georgia, and that was pointed out. but it was always this unrelying -- underlying bailiff belief we were entitled -- it was the way we grew up. the nones who were immigrants who would explain it to us we were entitled as citizens of the country to be full participates. there was never any doubt that we were inherently equal. it said so in the decoration of independents. there were times later on -- make remarks reciting the not so pleasant remarks and reciting the pledge of allee again or say things i think were -- not be cell phones. [laughter] people can youtube and you it's around forever. i was upset about thing. but i grew up in an environment with people around me who believed that this country could be
and very fast changing environment. so, i am grateful to all of you for coming and look forward to our discussion and at this point i would like to invite shibley telhami to the podium to present the poll. >> thanks a lot, tammie. it's always great to be here. i'm going to just present not the whole thing but some of the findings so we can get on with the conversation i will present a highlight. i just want to give you a little bit of a picture about this particular poll. it was conducted by knowledge networks sample of 737 that is designed to be a national representative in an internet panel. the methodology is described in the information that we will put all and is also available online. i also want to say that it's really my pleasure and honor to partner to the sinnott program at the university of maryland, and a program for policy international policy attitudes and particularly my colleague, steve coll, who has a recent book published by brookings about feeling betrayed about muslim attitudes which is an excellent book but also the fact the we did the september 27 to october 2nd w
environment, you know, fill in the blank. now, again, this is something that we could debate about at great length, but i assume that if you like federalism defined as some degree of subnational autonomy where people can make decisions rell thetively free -- relatively free of national override, then our constitution does a dreadful job in protecting local autonomy. you might, on the other hand, believe in some areas we have too much local autonomy as a political matter and would want to address that in a constitution. you mentioned cities that are very interesting. texas is six times as large as the entire united states population in 1790. we in austin especially are familiar with the tyranny of a centralized government in austin itself called the state government that often seems determined to deprive the city of austin of autonomy over matters that we hold near and dear. so i think that to the extent that federalism does stand for a principle of decision making at subnational levels and allowing people to participate if decisions that effect their lives, then any modern constitutional co
, and the environment. in the white house, leon panetta was director of the office of management budget and chief of staff, fostering policies that led to a balanced budget in the 1990s making america stronger. at the central intelligence agency, he enabled a spirited response to international terrorism with notable results, disrupting and defeating terror networks. as the nation's 23rd sex tear of defense, leon panetta struck a balance as a force of the advocate for efficiencies also standing resolute in favor of an adequately funded military. bens is pleased to bestow the award recognizing those outstanding americans whose contributions to the country reflect security as the total product of our economic, intellectual, moral, and military strength. secretary panetta. [applause] >> thank you. [applause] thank you very much. thank you so much for this wonderful evening and the chance to enjoy some terrific company and be able to express my deepest gratitude to this organization for all of the great things that it does on behalf of those that receiver in our military. bruce, my greatest thanks to
and a cleaner environment but an energy policy that creates 5 million new jobs. a foreign policy that ends this war in iraq. a foreign policy that goes after the one mission the american public gave the president after 9/11, to get and capture or kill bin laden. and to eliminate al qaeda. a policy that would, in fact, engage our allies in making sure that we knew we were acting on the same page and not dictating. and a policy that would reject the bush doctrine of preemption and regime change and replace it with the doctrine of prevention and cooperation, and ladies and gentlemen, this is the biggest ticket item we have in this election, the most important election you will ever, ever have voted in since 1932. and we are such stark differences. i would follow through on barack's policies to get in essence i agree with everything, every major initiative he has suggested. >> moderator: governor. palin: and heaven forbid yes, that that would ever happen. no matter how this ends up, that that would ever happen with either party. as for disagreeing with john mccain and how our administration wo
say make us safer and stronger in this new threatened environment is very curious. i think it does have something to do with them as i started, with a vision that the governor has. if your vision of what's happening in the world is driven by russia's strategic threat and you want to confront china on day one and you want to confront the states, and you want to be hunkered down in the middle east while these transnational threats and substate actors are hitting is very hard, then that's a totally different approach, i agree. if you want to be where the president has been, which is very aggressive against al qaeda, supporting the democratic and moderate forces, during the transitions in afghanistan and iraq, frankly to lighten our burden in the middle east, so we could move into confront other threats of the world. it is a faster, more agile, it is a smarter, tougher and stronger approach. one has to look at the previous administrations. if that's what people want in their security process going forward, they can have it again because it sounds exactly like what it does, is suggestin
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)